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Boeing'{july 30 s Starliner spacecraft just met its rocket for NASA test launch}

Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft {offers|provides} {already been} mated to its rocket ride {before} its July 30 launch. 

The mission, {known as} Orbital Flight Test 2 (OFT-2), {will undoubtedly be} Boeing’s {2nd} attempt at launching its {fresh|brand-new} astronaut taxi to the International Space Station . The CST-100 Starliner spacecraft {has been|had been} stacked atop its United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket on July 17 at Florida’s Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, marking {an integral} milestone {prior to the} mission’s launch {in a few days}.

“{Viewing} the Starliner atop the Atlas V {simply} days {from} launch {will be} symbolic of how proud {we} feels about executing this mission,” John Vollmer, vice president and {system|plan} manager for Boeing’s Commercial Crew {System|Plan}, {stated|mentioned} in a {declaration} from Boeing. ” OFT-2 {is really a} critical milestone on our {way to} crewed flights, and {we are all} {prepared to} see our {effort} {become more active} with {an effective} mission from {starting to} {finish}.”

{Associated}: Photo tour: Inside Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner spaceship hangar

Boeing’s CST-100 Starliner spacecraft was {guaranteed} atop {the} United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket at the Vertical Integration Facility at Space Launch Complex-41 at Florida’s Cape Canaveral Space Force Station on July 17, 2021. (Image credit: United Launch Alliance)

Boeing shared a video of the CST-100 Starliner spacecraft being rolled {out from the|from the} Commercial Crew and Cargo Processing Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida around 4:00 a.m. EDT (0800 GMT) on July 17. The spacecraft {has been|had been} driven 10 miles (16 kilometers) to United Launch Alliance’s Vertical Integration Facility at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, {where {it had been} hoisted and mated to its Atlas V rocket.|where {it had been} mated and hoisted to its Atlas V rocket.} Now, {teams will perform integrated testing {to guarantee the} two spacecraft are communicating properly {ahead of} launch.|teams shall perform integrated testing to ensure the two spacecraft are communicating properly prior to launch.} 

The OFT-2 mission {will undoubtedly be} Boeing’s {2nd} uncrewed test flight, {made to} {assess} the {abilities|features} of its Starliner spacecraft, {which includes} launch, docking, atmospheric re-{access} and a desert landing in the western U.S. The mission {will be|is usually|is definitely|can be|is certainly} {designed|intended} to demonstrate that Starliner {will be|is usually|is definitely|can be|is certainly} ready to transport NASA astronauts to and from the space station, {based on the} {declaration}.

Boeing’s {1st|very first|initial} Starliner test flight {released} in December 2019. However, the spacecraft {do} {not really} reach the space station as {prepared} due to a series of technical {issues|difficulties|troubles|complications} . {Pursuing|Adhering to|Using|Right after|Sticking with} a postflight review, {{the business} completed {a large number of} NASA {needs|specifications} before announcing {it could} repeat the orbital flight test.|the ongoing company completed {a large number of} NASA requirements before announcing {it could} repeat the orbital flight test.} 

“Boeing {worked well|proved helpful} hand-in-hand with NASA to address lessons {discovered} from Starliner’s {1st|very first|initial} flight, {which includes} re-verifying flight code, {finishing} a comprehensive test of flight {software program}, and {carrying out|executing} an end-to-{finish} mission rehearsal with {last} flight software, {mission and hardware operators,}” officials {stated|mentioned} in the {declaration}. {

The OFT-2 mission {once was} targeting launch in March 2021.|

The OFT-2 mission {has been|had been} targeting launch {inside} March 2021 previously.} However, Boeing {skilled} delays due to scheduling conflicts with {some other|additional|various other} missions headed to the space station, {{and also|along with|in addition to} {specialized} and weather issues.|{and also|along with|in addition to} weather and technical issues.} 

If all goes according to {strategy|program}, {on July 30 at 2:53 p the Starliner spacecraft will launch.}m. EDT (1853 GMT) from Space Launch Complex 41. The capsule, which will {have|bring} supplies and test equipment {and also|along with|in addition to} a flight dummy dubbed Rosie the Rocketeer to simulate future crewed missions, {should dock with {the area} station {the very next day}.|{day time|time} should dock with {the area} station the next.} 

{Adhere to|Stick to} Samantha Mathewson @Sam_Ashley13. {Adhere to|Stick to} us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook.  

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